Thomas Horton on ‘Rediscovering Antitrust’s Lost Values’ (2018) New Hampshire Law Review 16(2) 179

Antitrust is now widely said to be dedicated to maximizing “consumer welfare” through an intense focus on promoting “allocative efficiency”. This article, which can be found here, seeks to provide evidence of how such a limited goal has no support in legislative history by tracing U.S. Congress’s consistent balancing of social, political, moral, and economic values and objectives over the course of more than a century of antitrust legislation. The paper is structured as follows: Part II reviews antitrust statutes throughout the years, and how they blend fundamental political, social, moral, and economic values. This section begins by reviewing scholarship on the legislative history of the US’ antitrust statutes. This review shows that there are differences in how conservative and progressive scholars have interpreted the relevant statutes. Conservatives traditionally identified mainly economic goals in the law, while Progressives extracted a number of other political and social goals from the relevant legislative acts. Differences regarding the goals found to be present…