Nicholas Levy ‘Judicial review of merger decisions: An overview of EU and national case law’ (2019) Concurrences Special Issue Mergers Judicial Review

When the European Merger Control Regulation (EMCR) was adopted, there was uncertainty about whether the EU Courts would act as an effective check on the Commission’s enforcement, and exert discipline on its decisions in the same way as U.S. courts discipline the U.S. federal agencies’ determinations of whether mergers should be allowed to proceed. There was also uncertainty as to the scope for timely judicial review. History has proven the sceptics wrong. The EU Courts have played a highly significant role in shaping the law and holding the Commission to account. Although the EU Courts have recognised that judicial deference is embedded in the EU system of merger control, they have nevertheless been ready to subject Commission decisions to careful and comprehensive review. The courts have also protected merging companies’ rights of defence, striking down decisions that have been insufficiently substantiated or based on findings inadequately presented to the merging parties during the administrative process. The EU Courts have also…

Frank Maier-Rigaud and Benjamin Loertscher ‘Structural v Behavioural Remedies’ (2020) CPI Chronicle April

Both antitrust and merger investigations at the EU level regularly conclude with the European Commission (“Commission”) accepting or imposing remedies. Despite the theories of harm underlying antitrust and merger investigations often being similar, if not identical, remedies in these two areas of competition law vary substantially. The predominance of behavioural remedies in antitrust cases stands in contrast to structural remedies relied upon in most merger investigations. This is surprising and begs the question of what are the factors driving the Commission’s remedies practice – which is the question that this paper, available here, seeks to address. Section II provides some background on the application of remedies under EU law. Under merger control, commitments accepted by the Commission “should be proportionate to the competition problem and entirely eliminate it.” Similarly, in antitrust enforcement the Commission can “impose any […] remedies which are proportionate to the infringement committed and necessary to bring the infringement effectively to an end”. The broadest classification for…

Chris Pike and Pedro Caro de Sousa ‘How Soon Is Now: How to Deal with Uncertainty as regards Potential Competition in Merger Control’ Competition Law and Policy Debate (forthcoming)

While a short time frame of analysis can help build confidence in the conclusions reached on the likely effects of a transaction within that time frame, it misses potential harms and benefits related to longer-term potential competition. To correct this analytical deficiency requires the use of a longer time frame of analysis. However, with a longer time frame comes greater uncertainty on both probabilities and the magnitude of outcomes. Such prospective assessments often imply the balancing of probabilities by decision-makers, which are subject to substantive, evidentiary and practical constraints. In cases involving potential competition, this uncertainty is further heightened, to the point where meeting evidentiary standards designed for a short time frame analysis can become near impossible. This paper, available here, explores avenues to deal with uncertainty under merger control, and advances two proposals. First, one should ensure that the substantive standards for clearing and prohibiting a merger reflect not only the probability but also the potential magnitude of anti-…

Giulio Federico, Fiona Scott Morton and Carl Shapiro ‘Antitrust and Innovation: Welcoming and Protecting Disruption’ in Innovation Policy and the Economy (eds. Josh Lerner and Scott Stern, NBER), Vol. 20, Chapter 4, 125

This paper, available here, focuses on the impact of competition policy on innovation. Disruptive firms drive a significant amount of innovation. By making its offer to customers attractive in a new way, a disruptive firm can destroy a great deal of incumbent profit while creating a large amount of consumer surplus. The resulting churn in products and market shares, as new products enter and old ones exit, and as newer business methods and business models supplant older ones, are typical of a healthy competitive process. If that competitive process is slowed or biased by mergers or by exclusionary conduct, innovation is lessened and consumers are harmed. Competition policy seeks to protect the competitive process by which disruptive firms challenge the status quo, despite the biggest firms being some of the most impressive innovators in many industries experiencing rapid technological change. Innovation is best promoted when market leaders are allowed to exploit their competitive advantages while also facing pressure to perform…

Justus Haucap, Alexander Rasch and Joel Stiebale on ‘How mergers affect innovation: Theory and evidence’ (2019) International Journal of Industrial Organization 63 283

This article, available here, argues that a complete analysis of potential efficiencies from mergers should not only analyse how the merged entity’s prices, quantities and innovation incentives change (i.e., the direct effects of a merger), but also how these change for rival firms (indirect effects). While competition authorities sometimes analyse how mergers directly affect the merged firm’s innovation incentives, especially in high-tech industries, impacts on rivals’ innovation incentives have been rarely mentioned in merger guidelines or competition cases. This is unfortunate, since the effects of mergers on innovation in the relevant market depend on the reactions of non-merging competitors. While there is a growing literature on the effects of mergers on the innovation of the merging firms, evidence on the effects of mergers on outsiders’ innovation incentives is scarce. Thus, this paper studies how horizontal mergers affect the innovation efforts of both the merged entity and its non-merging competitors. Using data on horizontal mergers among pharmaceutical firms in Europe, it…

Tommaso Valletti and Hans Zenger on ‘Mergers with differentiated products: Where do we stand?’

This paper, available here, provides an overview of the state of economic analysis of unilateral effects in mergers with differentiated products. It discusses both static and dynamic competition. Section 2 focuses on price competition and discusses the calibration of unilateral effects using diversion-based tools such as upward pricing pressure. One of the most prominent developments of the past decades was to put closeness of substitution at the heart of unilateral effects analysis. It is well known that market shares can be off the mark in trying to account for consumers’ heterogeneous switching patterns between differentiated products. When robust data is available, it is therefore more sensible to assess competitive overlaps directly via diversion ratios than to rely on market shares as an imperfect proxy. Obtaining an estimate of diversion is feasible in many, though far from all, significant mergers (e.g., through switching data, bidding data, customer surveys, event studies or demand estimation). While diversion ratios provide a good indication of…

Pauline Affeldty, Tomaso Dusoz and Florian Szücs on ‘25 Years of European Merger Control’ (2019) DIW Berlin Discussion Paper 179

The first European merger control regime came into force in 1990. Since then, merger control has evolved significantly. This paper, available here, employs a new dataset, comprising all merger cases until 2014 that led to a decision by DG Comp (more than 5,000 individual decisions). The goal of the paper is to evaluate the time dynamics of the European Commission’s decision procedures. Specifically, the paper assesses how consistently different arguments related to so-called structural market parameters – market shares, concentration, likelihood of entry and foreclosure – were deployed by the Commission over time. The paper first estimates the probability of intervention as a function of merger characteristics. It finds that the existence of barriers to entry, increases in concentration and, in particular, the share of product markets with competitive concerns are positively associated with intervention by the Commission. After the reform of 2004, an effects-based approach centred on a clearly stated theory of harm became a cornerstone of EU merger…

Julian Nowag and Liisa Tarkkila on ‘How much effectiveness for the EU Damages Directive? Contractual clauses and antitrust damages’ (2020) Common Market Law Review 57 433

Market actors often include clauses in contracts which determine the jurisdiction, and/or forum in which any claim arising from the contract may be heard; or clauses which prohibit reassigning a claim or joining a class action. In some situations, these clauses may make it more difficult to obtain full compensation for a competition law infringement. Antitrust victims can be forced to bring damages actions in jurisdictions or before arbitrational tribunals that have less favourable cost and evidential rules; they may also encounter language-related problems. Similarly, preventing forms of collective redress has obvious benefits for defendants whenever a large number of victims only suffered very small individual harm. This paper, available here, explores the extent to which the aims of the Damages Directive and development of a strong EU private enforcement system in Member States’ courts might be undercut by such contractual arrangements. It argues that EU law protects consumers against clauses that could hinder the full effectiveness of the right to compensation…