Marco Botta and Klaus Wiedemann  ‘To Discriminate or not to Discriminate? Personalised Pricing in Online Markets as Exploitative Abuse of Dominance’ (2019) European Journal of Law and Economics 1

The advent of big data analytics has favoured the emergence of forms of price discrimination based on consumers’ profiles and their online behaviour (i.e. personalised pricing). This paper, available here, analyses this practice as a possible exploitative abuse by dominant online platforms. It concludes that such practices can have ambiguous welfare effects, and be subject to a case-by-case analysis. It also argues that competition law is more suitable than omnibus regulation – particularly data protection and consumer law – to tackle the negative effects of personalised pricing, particularly because competition authorities could negotiate with online platforms different kinds of behavioural commitments that could significantly tame the risks of personalised pricing. Section II looks at price discrimination in online markets. Economists typically distinguish between three different types of price discrimination. First-degree price discrimination takes place when a firm is able to discriminate perfectly among its customers. Second-degree price discrimination means that the firm discriminates between its customers by granting discounts once…

Alfonso Lamadrid ‘Shortcuts in the Era of Digitisation’ (2019) CPI Antitrust Chronicle – October

Competition law is arguably one of the areas of least importance when it comes to the major societal challenges posed by digitalisation. Nonetheless, competition law has been advertised as a sort of miraculous tool that would right all wrongs. In this context, the idea of entrusting a Report to three independent Special Advisers before advancing a reorientation of the competition rules was a very sensible initiative on the part of the European Commission. However, the author does not really agree with the report’s conclusions. He explain why in a paper that can be found here. Section two discusses what are the specific problems that digital markets raise for competition law. The first question to ask is whether there is consensus about competition problems in digital markets. If the answer is in the affirmative, we then need to ask whether we can address those problems while still preserving the benefits flowing from digitisation. The Report and other similarly-timed initiatives suggest that there…

Marc van der Voude ‘Judicial Control in Complex Economic Matters’ (2019) Journal of European Competition Law & Practice 10(7) 415

Already in the early 1960’s, the Court of Justice made clear that the application of competition law depends on contextual analysis that takes a wide range of economic and legal factors into account. Modern economics provides useful tools to deal with competition matters. The European Commission increasingly relies on these ‘mainstream’ economics in its assessment of competition cases, and courts have to make up their own mind on the merits of the Commission’s complex assessments and of the economic concepts on which the Commission relied to that effect. What kind of judicial control are the Union courts supposed to exercise over these complex assessments?  Under the current system set up by Article 263 TFEU, judicial review by the General Court, which has the final say on the interpretation of the facts of the case, is limited to the review of the legality of the Commission’s decision. In its case law, the Court of Justice has traditionally used formulae that suggest…

Massimiliano Kadar ‘Article 102 and Exclusivity Rebates in a Post-Intel World: Lessons from the Qualcomm and Google Android Cases’ (2019) Journal of European Competition Law & Practice 10(7) 439

Article 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) prohibits behaviour by a dominant undertaking that is capable of harming competition. The notion of ‘capability to harm competition’ has been at the centre of the legal and economic debate for many years. A strict interpretation of ‘capability’ would require evidence of actual or quasi-actual effects on the market in the form of, for example, the exit of existing competitors or sustained price increases. A lax interpretation of capability could make it possible to enforce competition rules also in circumstances where harm to competition is purely hypothetical and not supported by concrete evidence. This discussion – which is ultimately about the level of the standard of proof – not only influences the likelihood of Type 1 and Type 2 letters, but also the amount of resources that administrative agencies needs to devote to individual enforcement cases. Modulating this impact are presumptions, which can lead to significant savings…

Cani Fernández ‘Presumptions and Burden of Proof in EU Competition Law: The Intel Judgment’ (2019) Journal of European Competition Law & Practice 10(7)

Some of the procedural tools used by competition authorities and courts (in particular, presumptions) present an inherent link to the burden of proof and to the rightful exercise of the rights of the defence. In principle, the use of presumptions can be an efficient response to the enforcement of competition policy both in situations where a given behaviour usually amounts to an infringement or where it is competitively innocuous. In any rule of law system, presumptions of illegality must be rebuttable. Indeed, a resort to presumptions not surrounded by proper procedural guarantees may infringe the presumption of innocence and undertakings’ rights of defence. The Intel judgment provides a good opportunity to discuss the role of presumptions under Article 102 TFEU and their implications for the burden of proof. In addition to this, this article, available here, analyses how defendants in exclusivity rebate cases can rebut the presumption of illegality in practice, with a special focus on the efficiency defence. It does so…

Pietro Crocioni ‘On the Relevant Cost Standard for Price-Cost Tests in Abuses of Dominance’ (2018) Journal of Competition Law & Economics 14(2) 26

This article, available here, reviews the use of cost standards in selected European abuse of dominance cases. It shows that a variety of cost standards were employed until recently, and criticises the ECJ’s case law for ignoring challenges with identifying the appropriate cost standard for each case. To address such challenges, it is important to identify the key questions a price–cost test should answer, and agree on the features of such a test. The paper is structured as follows: Section II summarises current knowledge on price-cost tests. This knowledge is outlined in the European Commission’s Article 102 Enforcement Guidance, which puts forward two widely accepted concepts: Average Avoidable Cost (AAC) and Long Range Average Incremental Costs (LRAIC). These tests provide the benchmarks for predatory behaviour in Europe. There is a legal (but rebuttable) presumption that prices below AAC anticompetitively foreclose competition; that prices above LRAIC do not to raise concerns; and that prices between AAC and LRAIC require consideration of…

Or Brook ‘Struggling with Article 101(3) TFEU: Diverging Approaches of the Commission, EU Courts and Five Competition Authorities’ (2019) Common Market Law Review 56: 121

Since May 2004, the European Commission and national competition authorities (NCAs) have applied the EU competition provisions in parallel. Nowadays, almost 90% of antitrust investigations are carried out by NCAs. This decentralised enforcement regime builds on the assumption that the obligation to apply the same competition provisions is sufficient to ensure the uniform administration of the law. This paper, available here, argues that this assumption does not hold, as least as regards efficiency justification/defences. Since the application of the EU competition provisions involves a wide margin of discretion, national, economic and political traditions risk leading to the fragmented application of competition law. The paper presents empirical evidence that the Commission, EU courts and five national competition authorities have followed very different interpretations of Article 101(3) TFEU, which regulates efficiency justification/defences in Europe. The paper is structured as follows: Section 2 outlines the study’s empirical methodology. The paper uses a database comprising: (i) all European Commission and court decisions until 2017;…

Peter Davies ‘Economic Evidence and Procedural Fairness’ (2018) Journal of Competition Law & Economics 14(1) 1

Economists have a large stake in the judicial and competition systems getting the scope and nature of disclosure right, both as a matter of public policy and as a practical matter. Access to information in the form of data, documents and analyses is critical to economists engaging with the substance of competition and regulatory cases. However, the extent and nature of information available to each party to a competition investigation varies widely, and is affected by important practical and legal considerations. In particular, the extent of disclosure is influence by a multiplicity of factors, such as the relevant statute, competition agency practice and the nature of judicial oversight of competition agency decision making. This paper, available here, considers the extent of disclosure required to ensure a fair process, while taking into account the practical realities of undertaking economic and econometric analyses in competition cases. It does so as follows: Section II explains why disclosure is fundamental to the application of…

EU group of experts, ‘Competition Policy for the digital era’

This Report, which can be found here, explores how competition policy should evolve to continue to promote pro-consumer innovation in the digital age. It is structured as follows. Chapter 2 describes the digital world and markets. The report focuses on three key characteristics of the digital economy: extreme returns to scale, networks externalities and role of data. Regarding returns to scale, the cost of production of digital services is disproportionate to the number of customers served. While this aspect is not novel as such (bigger factories or retailers are often more efficient than smaller ones), the digital world pushes it to the extreme and this can result in a significant competitive advantage for incumbents. Concerning network externalities, the convenience of using a technology or a service increases with the number of users that adopt it. Consequently, it is not enough for a new entrant to offer better quality and/or a lower price than the incumbent does; it also has to…

Stigler Center (University of Chicago) Report on Digital Platforms

This Report, which can be found here, was written by a working group who came together to address specific problems arising from the digital platforms’ reach, scale, scope, and use of data. They examined concerns stemming from the market structure contemporary platforms have created, and to investigate their competitive behaviour, including the consequences of network effects that can create barriers to entry for new innovators and entrench incumbents. The theme that runs throughout the report is the difficulty of entry into digital platform businesses once an incumbent is established. Whether the entrant is vertical or horizontal, has succeeded to some degree, is nascent, is a potential entrant, or is a large platform in an adjacent space, market entry improves consumer welfare by either providing more choice, different features, and a chance of higher quality, or creating a threat that spurs the incumbent to provide lower prices, higher quality and innovation, and to do so more quickly. The Report is structured…