Angela Huyue Zhang, Jingchen Liu and Nuno Garoupa on ‘Judging in Europe: Do Legal Traditions Matter?’ (2018) Journal of Competition Law & Economics 14(1) 144

Infringement decisions adopted by the European Commission in competition procedures are subject to review by the Court of Justice of the European Union (‘CJEU’). The CJEU is an international tribunal comprising judges from countries with varying legal traditions within Europe. This empirical paper, available here, seeks to determine whether the outcome of appeals from European Commission infringement decisions are affected by the legal origins of the judge rapporteur. In particular, the authors test whether judges coming from countries with French-inspired administrative systems are more likely to decide in favour of the Commission. They find that this is indeed the case, and that the results are robust to alternative political ideology variables, including left–right politics and a preference for European integration. The paper is structured as follows: Section 2 delves into the various legal traditions of Europe, and how they may influence the judicial review of competition appeals. There is extensive literature demonstrating that preconceptions nourished by education, work experience and…

Vivek Ghosal and Daniel Sokol on ‘The Rise and (Potential) Fall of U.S. Cartel Enforcement’

This working paper, which is available here,  is still rough around the edges, but it contains a number of interesting insights, which I thought might be of interest. This essay traces how the institutional setting of U.S. cartel enforcement evolved over the years, and assesses these developments from an optimal deterrence framework. In doing so, the authors also review the outcomes of the various US policy regimes in terms of number of cartels prosecuted, the level of financial penalties imposed per individual and firm, and of jail time for cartel crimes. The authors also offer an analysis of how cartel enforcement has varied with recent US Presidential administrations. Section 3 describes how cartel enforcement has evolved in the US since 1890. Cartel enforcement in US began with the passage of the Sherman Act, which imposed a maximum fine for collusion of USD 5,000, raised to USD 50,000 in 1955. Jail time was not actively pursued until the late 1950s, when…

Murillo Campello (Cornell), Daniel Ferrés  (Montevideo) and Gaizka Ormazabal  (IESE)  ‘Whistle-Blowers on the Board? The Role of Independent Directors in Cartel Prosecutions’ (2017) The Journal of Law and Economics 60(20 241

The goal of this paper – which can be found here – is to examine ‘whether market-based penalties for nonexecutive officials [more specifically, independent board members] in firms involved in price-fixing are significant in shaping their behaviours.’ The reason to focus on independent board members is that they ‘are highly sensitive to market sanctions (for example, in the form of reputational losses). Importantly, directors have powers not only to order internal investigations but also to require officers and employees to cooperate with prosecutors. In some cases, boards also establish special committees and appoint outside counsel to consider applications for leniency. As a result, they constitute a set of corporate insiders whom antitrust policies can exploit in designing prosecution policies.’ The paper is structured as follows: Second 2 begins by providing an overview of US and EU regimes for cartel prosecution and leniency. It also describes the role of corporate boards in cartel investigations. In the US: ‘Once the corporation learns…

William Kovacic and Marianela Lopez-Galdos ‘The Lifecycles of Competition Systems : Explaining Variation in the Implementation of New Regimes’ (2016) 79 Law and Contemporary Problems 85

Starting from the observation that, over the last 30 years, antitrust / competition law has had a rate of adoption across the world almost without parallel in the history of economic regulation, this article – which can be found here – examines one particular aspect of the global adoption of  competition law systems: what jurisdictions must do to build the institutions needed for effective competition law implementation, and in particular, to develop programs that improve economic performance. The underlying assumption is that “improvements in institutional arrangements [i.e. institutional design and policy implementation] tend to yield superior policy outcomes.” The article is structured as follows: Part II sets out the major assumptions that underpin the theory outlined in the article. These assumptions are based on “a large and growing body of literature on the development of new competition law systems”, on “a benchmarking project undertaken by the George Washington [which] has collected information about ten major institutional characteristics for the world’s 130 competition…