Angela Huyue Zhang ‘Strategic Comity’ (2019) Yale Journal of International Law 44(2)

The extent to which US courts should enforce antitrust laws against state-led export cartels has been the subject of intense debate among academics, courts and policymakers for decades. While defendants often invoke the state compulsion defence, which is based on comity and respect for foreign sovereigns, these doctrines have long been criticised for their ambiguity and inconsistent application. The recent Supreme Court decision regarding the Chinese state-led Vitamin C cartel – reviewed here – highlights a number of challenges with the way these doctrines have been applied in the US. The author’s argument in this paper, available here, is that the application of both comity and foreign state compulsion defences are susceptible to political considerations, and that the Supreme Court decision is a good example of this. The author argues that the Supreme Court proactively solicited the opinion of the executive branch before hearing its case, and its final ruling is exactly in line with the opinions and suggestions proposed…

Jonathan T. Fried ‘The place of competition and development in the global trade and economic architecture’ (2017) Concurrences 1 3

The author was the Canadian ambassador to the WTO. In this piece, available here, which is the opening speech to a conference on ‘Competition and globalization in developing economies’, he argues that trade liberalisation must be accompanied by sound economic regulation that enables trade and investment to occur. Robust and effective competition law and regulation is a key element of this enabling environment, and a potential contributor to sustainable development as well. The trade and competition communities have been supporting each other’s goals, and applying similar approaches, for some time. Building on this base, there are actions that will lead to the better integration of trade and competition perspectives, while avoiding being drawn into grand debates about new forms of global governance, as has happened in the past. In a first section, the paper provides an overview of the international trade regime. From its post-war beginnings as an “interim” agreement called the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (‘GATT’) through…

Julien Briguet ‘The State’s Invisible Hand: Chinese SOEs Facing EU Antitrust Law‘ (2018) World Competition Law 52(5) 839

Chinese outbound merger and acquisition (M&A) activity has surged in Europe during the last decade. Chinese companies, particularly state-owned enterprises (SOEs) were the key drivers of this surge, amounting to 70% of these investments in Europe. This paper, available here, argues that the way the European Commission looks at mergers involving Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs) suffers from several flaws. These arise primarily from inconsistency in how the single economic entity doctrine has been applied to these companies – sometimes a single Chinese SOE is taken to be the relevant economic unit, sometimes all SOEs active in a specific industry were said to comprise the acquiring undertaking. The author argues that a more systematic application of the single economic entity doctrine is required to restore consistency to the case law, address the realities of China’s State capitalism and protect the principle of competitive neutrality at the core of EU competition law. Section two reviews how the single economic entity doctrine applies…

Florian Wagner Von Papp ‘Competition Law in EU Free Trade and Cooperation Agreements (and What the UK Can Expect After Brexit)’ European Yearbook of International Economic Law, Forthcoming

This paper – which can be found here – focuses on the interplay between trade and competition from a competition perspective. Its basic argument is that the more integrated a trade area is, the more similar competition rules are likely to be, and the easier it will be for international cooperation to occur.  The focus of the paper is on demonstrating how this occurs in practice, by looking at “the concentric circles of cooperation around the EU by examining the intergovernmental and inter-agency agreements concluded by the EU to face the complexities of the transnational economy of the 21st century.” Section 2 contains a short overview of the relationship between free trade and competition law. Free trade interacts with competition law on many levels, and their relationship is mainly symbiotic and self-reinforcing. However, competition and trade law conflict at points. Free trade should increase competition, since market entry by foreign competitors undermines domestic market power. Competition law is then useful…

Lee Hyo-young ‘Applying Competition Policy to Optimise International Trade Rules’ Korea Institute for International Economic Law 17-01

This paper – which can be found here – focuses on the relationship between trade and competition, and particularly on how the (apparently deceased, now revived) Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) imposes new rules on State-Owned Enterprises. It is structured as follows: Part II reviews how competition policy has historically figured in trade agreements. It contains an overview of the relationship between competition and international trade rules – in the Havana Charter, GATT and the WTO. This section also discusses how both competition and international trade law share the objective of enhancing economic efficiency and consumer welfare through trade liberalization and open markets. As a result, competition law is important for successful trade liberalisation, and to prevent anticompetitive and collusive conduct between businesses and governments that, from an international trade law perspective, amount to a form of non-tariff barrier that hinders access to markets by foreign competitors. After reviewing the main international trade law treaties, the author concludes that current rules fail…