Gönenç Gürkaynak, Ali Kağan Uҫar and Zeynep Buharali ‘Data-Related Abuses in Competition Law’ in Standing Up for Convergence and Relevance in Antitrust – Frédéric Jenny Liber Amicorum – Volume I (eds. Ahmad and Charbit, 2019) Concurrences

Data has become an indispensable business tool, and, as a result, the collection and use of data by dominant undertakings can give rise to competition law concerns. This article, available here, examines data-related abuses in competition law, and seeks to provide an overview of specific types of abuses arising from the use of data. Section II looks at the definition of data. Data is often defined as “information that can be stored and used by a computer program.” Accordingly, “big data” refers to “large amounts of different types of data produced at high speed from multiple sources, requiring new and more powerful processors and algorithms to process and to analyse’. As “data” increases in volume, diversifies in nature and content, and keeps on flowing rapidly through the veins of the global economy, its collection and processing creates increasingly valuable commercial opportunities. Undertakings more and more see data as an indispensable tool for improving business decisions and strategies, and for improving…

Björn Lundqvist ‘Regulating competition in the digital economy’ in Competition Law for the Digital Economy (ed. Björn Lundqvist and Michal S. Gal) (2019, Elgar)

There is an intense academic discussion regarding whether consumers and business users are exposed to conduct that may amount to competition law abuses when using Internet services. The discussion is connected to the Internet phenomenon of ‘platforms’ or intermediaries. The multitude of direct customer–supplier transactions making up everyday business conduct are, to an increasing degree, replaced on the Internet by an intermediary, the platform, matching the customer with the supplier. Platforms are able to perform role because they provide efficient and easy matching. Further, internet platforms may, due to certain special and somewhat unique characteristics – like network effects, tipping and path dependency – become central ‘hubs’ between purchasers and suppliers. This chapter, available here, focuses on the application of competition law vis-à-vis the platforms collecting personal and non-personal data. It considers questions such as: may competition law be used to gain access to intermediaries’ data, and the infrastructure around that data? May competition law be used to limit the…