Karen Geurts and Johannes Van Biesebroeck ‘Employment Growth following Takeovers’ (2019) The Rand Journal of Economics 50(4) 916

This paper, available here, takes a sample of takeovers in Belgium over five years, and estimates their impact on employment growth. It finds that the average merger temporarily reduces employment of the combined entity by −1.4%. However, long-term effects are markedly different. Mergers likely to be motivated by acquiring or defending market power show a stronger and permanent employment reduction of −14%, whereas those motivated by efficiency gains lead to employment expansions of +10%. Section I sets the scene. Existing research provides a range of estimates for the employment effects of mergers, with no consensus having emerged about the predominant effect of mergers on employment. Studies that find a negative effect outnumber those that find a positive effect, but all come with caveats. At the same time, the literature has long noted the potential for efficiency gains from mergers. Acquirers often argue that reduced variable costs can offset market power and lead to lower prices, which in turn can raise…

Massimo Motta and Martin Peitz ‘Removal of Potential Competitors – A Blind Spot of Merger Policy?’ (2020) Competition Law and Policy Debate (6)2 19

Mergers that may look conglomerate or vertical at first glance may in essence be horizontal, inasmuch as they involve the removal of a potential competitor. Indeed, many conglomerate and vertical mergers can be addressed from the perspective of potential competition. Economists have started to look into vertical and conglomerate mergers which can be analysed from this perspective in the pharma and digital sectors; however, the issue is not restricted to these sectors. Merger policy must deal with two issues as regards such mergers: (1) how to make sure that potentially problematic mergers are notified and investigated; and (2) how to assess the social costs and benefits of such mergers. This paper, available here, looks at both these issues. Second II looks at the theory and evidence of mergers to remove potential competitors. Large firms have been taking over dozens of small technology firms which have not yet marketed their products, or that were at an initial phase of rollout. Such…