Damien Geradin and Katarzyna Sadrak‘The EU Competition Law Fining System: A Quantitative Review of the Commission Decisions between 2000 and 2017

This paper – which can be found here – takes a quantitative approach to analysing the factors considered by the Commission when establishing the amount of fines imposed on infringing undertakings in 110 cartel decisions, as well as on 11 abuse of dominance decisions adopted between January 2000 and March 2017. The analysis shows that the Commission has made significant use of the aggravating and mitigating circumstances listed in the Fining Guidelines to adjust the basic amount of the fine. The article is structured as follows: Part II examines the methodology applied by the Commission when determining fine amounts. Article 23(2) of Regulation 1/2003 is the sole legal basis for the imposition of fines by the Commission for anti-competitive conduct. This Article provides that “the fine shall not exceed 10% of [the undertaking’s] total turnover in the preceding business year’. To make its method for setting fines clearer and more transparent, the Commission had published Fining Guidelines in 1998, which were…

Anne C. Witt ‘The Enforcement of Article 101 TFEU: What has happened to the Effects Analysis’ (2018) Common Market Law Review (55) 417

This paper – which You can find here – focuses on the role that priority setting and institutional dynamics can have on public competition enforcement. It argues that, while the Commission has developed an impressive theoretical framework for assessing the effects of agreements on competition, there has in fact been very little effects analysis in the Commission’s decisional practice since 2005. Instead, most cases have been decided as ‘object restrictions’. The paper is structured as follows: A first section briefly retraces how the Commission came to endorse a more effects-based approach to EU competition law generally, and to Article 101 TFEU in particular. By the late 1990s, commentators had been long criticising the Commission for relying too heavily on form-based presumptions of legality and illegality in its assessments under Articles 101 and 102 TFEU. Commentators pressed the Commission to scale back the use of form-based presumptions in favour of more individual assessments in line with contemporary US antitrust law. The Commission…