Ariel Ezrachi and Maurice Stucke ‘The fight over antitrust’s soul’ (2017) Journal of European Competition Law & Practice 9(1) 1

The piece – which can be found here – begins by describing recent trends in academic discussions in antitrust, which I think this blog has followed in some detail over the past two years. On the one hand, we have the ‘hipster antitrust/New Brandeis’ school, with its criticism of Chicago school-based enforcement and its calls for greater intervention. On the other hand, we have the reactions to this antitrust movement which: ‘warn about enforcement chilling pro-competitive behaviour, and undermining the market’s ability to self-correct […] is unconcerned about the trend toward concentration, and reject fairness or distribution concerns as part of competition policy.’ The authors trace this debate to a number of factors. While they identify a number of them, from my perspective the debate ultimately stems from different understandings about how the economy works in practice. Some differences could ultimately be settled by reference to empirical data – for example, the debate between those who believe markets necessarily self-correct…

Niamh Dunne ‘Competition Law (and its Limits) in the Sharing Economy’ Forthcoming, Nestor Davidson, Michèle Finck and John Infranca (eds.), Cambridge Handbook on Law and Regulation of the Sharing Economy (Cambridge University Press)

As the title indicates: ‘This contribution (which can be found here) considers the potential application of competition law—specifically, the ‘antitrust’ rules governing anticompetitive unilateral or coordinated conduct—within the sharing economy.’ The sharing economy is described as a sector marked by recurrent characteristics, such as: (i) its underlying economic rationale is the under-utilisation of durable goods or other assets, which generates excess capacity that can be rented out; (ii) sharing economy businesses provide classic examples of ‘disruptive’ innovation, which originates outside a value network and displaces it; (iii) the innovations that underpin the sharing economy are rooted in the internet and mobile technologies; (iv) sharing economy businesses are often platforms in multi-sided markets; (v) sharing economy firms frequently conflict with regulatory regimes that control and limit the activities of competitors, resulting in recurrent critiques that such competition is inherently ‘unfair’. The paper is structured as follows: Section II examines how prohibitions against anticompetitive unilateral conduct may apply to the sharing economy. It begins…

Carl Shapiro ‘Antitrust in Times of Populism’

This paper – which can be found here – has been surrounded by a lot of publicity, and is a potentially important piece. It begins with an observation that goes to the heart of the debate:  ‘politicians are calling on antitrust to solve an array of problems associated with the excessive power of large corporations’. The author believes that ‘concerns about corporate power, and today’s renewed interest in antitrust, represent an opportunity to strengthen competition policy.’ At the same time, he alerts that the role of antitrust in promoting competition could well be undermined if antitrust is called upon or expected to address problems not directly relating to competition, such as the political power of corporations or income inequality. The ‘central purpose of this article is to assess the relevant economic evidence regarding competition (…) and then, based on that evidence and on antitrust learning and experience, identify ways to improve and strengthen antitrust.’ The paper is structured as follows:…