Richard N. Langlois ‘Hunting the Big Five: Twenty-first Century Antitrust in Historical Perspective’

In this paper – available at https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3124356 – the author considers that proponents of the New Brandeis movement in antitrust are animated by a perception that antitrust is not fit for purpose in the digital age. He considers that this movement is arguing for a return to an earlier age of greater interventionism and greater focus on market structures – which is why he calls this movement ‘new structuralism’. Given this focus, proponents of this movement also advocate for a complete overthrow of the Chicago school paradigm, with its anti-interventionist bias. The author’s argument is that the New Brandeis School gets its History wrong, misconceives the nature of the competitive process, and deliberately refuses to confront the political economy of antitrust. He builds his argument as a rebuttal of Lisa Kahn’s article on Amazon (which I circulated and discussed on 3 March 2017). In the interest of clarity, I will ignore that part of the argument when reviewing the paper,…

Herbert Hovenkamp “Whatever Did Happen to the Antitrust Movement?”

This paper argues that recent claims to the effect that antitrust should be used to combat a variety of social ills – such as industrial concentration, the economic or political power of large firms, the maldistribution of wealth, high profits, low wages, or the absence of policies protecting small business – are not new. Such claims have appeared and reappeared periodically in the history of antitrust, and amount to a rhetorical use of antitrust for promoting various societal goals which must be distinguished from the technical enterprise of antitrust. There is between these two dimensions of antitrust an unsurmountable contradiction, as the main goal of the antitrust enterprise (lower prices, larger output, etc.) will often be at odds with the rhetorical uses of antitrust (e.g. protecting small businesses). The paper is structured as follows: A first section looks at the virtues and defects of technical antitrust. “Technical antitrust” refers to: “a set of antitrust rules that begin with a picture…

Maurice E. Stucke ‘Reconsidering Antitrust’s Goals’

This is a more recent paper to the ABA one identified in the post below, which has the advantage of also being an analytical / critical piece. To be clear, I do not necessarily support or condone the criticisms set out in the paper – but I do like how his analysis makes one think about what antitrust should be about. The article can be found at http://lawdigitalcommons.bc.edu/bclr/vol53/iss2/4/. While mainly focused on the US, the paper is interesting for its (critical) description of how our current understanding of antitrust as being mainly devoted to promoting consumer welfare and efficiency came about (interesting tidbit: before 1975, the US Supreme Court had never mentioned “consumer welfare” in an antitrust case); and of how this “official” understanding conflicts with the proliferation of antitrust goals to be found in laws across the world (which leads to a useful review of such antitrust goals, mainly relying on ICN work). The critical part is also interesting for…

Herbert Hovenkamp ‘The Rule of Reason’

This paper by Hovenkamp – available at https://scholarship.law.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.fr/&httpsredir=1&article=2780&context=faculty_scholarship – on the US rule of reason. It describes the historical background for the development of the rule of reason and its procedural requirements in US litigation.  It is short, very thorough, very opinionated, and should interesting to anyone interested on the basic underpinnings of competition law analysis (even if one is not a US antitrust lawyer). The paper covers a lot of ground, including: the trade-off between consumer and general welfare as antitrust standards;  different modes of analysis of antitrust infringements (e.g. per se, rule of reason and “quick look”); how to balance pro- and anti-competitive effects;  the shifting role of the per se prohibitions and rule of reason (i.e. a trend over the last 40 years towards reducing the role for per se rules as antitrust enforcement has focused more and more on the effect of individual business practices); and the main practical difficulties in applying the concepts underpinning a rule-of-reason analysis. While…