Jose Luis da Cruz Vilaca on ‘The intensity of judicial review in complex economic matters – recent competition law judgments of the Court of Justice of the EU’ (2018) Journal of Antitrust Enforcement 6(2) 173–188

The author of this paper, available here, was for a long time the President of the Court of First Instance (now the ECJ’s General Court). More importantly for our purposes here, he was also the CJEU judge responsible for drafting the Intel judgment. The paper is structured as follows: A first section reviews how EU courts approach judicial review in complex matters, and how this approach has evolved over time. For a number of years, the Court of Justice (ECJ) has taken a careful approach to the scope and intensity of review of Commission decisions as regards complex economic matters. From the outset, the Court conceived its role in competition matters as being limited to reviewing legality, and not as involving unlimited jurisdiction or full merits review (except as regards the imposition of fines). Since Consten & Grunding in 1966, the ECJ has acknowledged that the Commission must engage in complex evaluations of economic matters. The judicial review of these evaluations…

The OECD Report on International Private Enforcement

Officially known as ‘Individual and Collective Private Enforcement of Competition Law: Insights for Mexico in 2018’, this Report was prepared with a view to advise Mexico on how to reform its private enforcement regime. The Report can be found here. Advising Mexico in this regard required the pursuit of a comprehensive overview of international experiences with private competition enforcement – with a focus on Europe and North America, but also looking beyond these regions. This project also required the identification of the various elements that comprise private enforcement regimes around the world, the various forms that each of these elements may take, and how these elements relate to one another. I may of course be mistaken, but I think there is no other work like this in the market. As such, I circulate the Report here because I think it can provide a useful reference for anyone working or interested in private enforcement.

Steven Salop  ‘An Enquiry Meet for the Case: Decision Theory, Presumptions, and Evidentiary Burdens in Formulating Antitrust Legal Standards’

Because legal decisions are adopted with imperfect information, decision-makers must strive to create a decision process and make decisions that are rational in light of the costs and benefits of information-gathering and the inevitable uncertainty under which they decide. Presumptions play an important role in this.  Antitrust law contains a number of important presumptions, which: ‘run the gamut along a continuum from irrebuttable (i.e. conclusive) anticompetitive presumptions to rebuttably anticompetitive to competitively neutral to conclusively procompetitive and finally to irrebuttable procompetitive presumptions. These presumptions are based on the effects inferred from the market conditions’ and most capture the central tendency of the category of conduct to increase or decrease competition and consumer welfare. This paper – which can be found here – seeks to understand, through the lens of economic decision theory, how the appropriate presumption for various categories of conduct should be established, and how rational presumptions and their associated post-rebuttal evidentiary burdens of production and persuasion can be better…

Herbert Hovenkamp ‘Antitrust Balancing’ (2016) NYU J. L. & Bus. 12 369

The basic argument of this paper, which can be found here, is that courts very rarely engage in any balancing even when cases fall under the rule of reason. Most people who are familiar with Hovenkamp’s work will not be particularly surprised by this argument. The interesting claim in this paper is that he thinks that there can be meaningful balancing in merger control – particularly when determining whether merger-induced efficiencies are sufficient to offset upward pricing pressures created by the merger. The paper is structured as follows: A first section looks at balancing under the Sherman Act. It points out that “aside from naked price fixing, market division, and a few boycotts, most agreements among competitors are addressed under the rule of reason”. It then explains (as he has done so many times before) that in practice: “the courts pursue rule of reason analyses through a verbal sequence something like this: first, the plaintiff has the burden to show…

Carl Shapiro and Herbert Hovenkamp ‘Horizontal Mergers, Market Structure, and Burdens of Proof’ (2018) Yale Law Journal 127(7) 1996

This paper, which can be found here, deals with the ‘structural presumption’ for merger control set out in US law by the Philadelphia National Bank case in 1963. In this case, the Supreme Court stated: “That ‘competition is likely to be greatest when there are many sellers, none of which has any significant market share,’ is common ground among most economists, and was undoubtedly a premise of congressional reasoning about the antimerger statute.’ The Supreme Court held that a merger producing a firm that controls an “undue percentage share” of the market and that “results in a significant increase in the concentration of firms in that market” is “inherently likely to lessen competition substantially.” As a result, the merger should be prohibited, at least “in the absence of evidence clearly showing that the merger is not likely to have such anticompetitive effects” The merging parties can then rebut this structural presumption by showing that the market shares do not accurately…

Cento Veljanowski “Credit Cards, Counterfactuals, and Antitrust Damages” Journal of European Competition Law & Practice (2018) 9(3) 146–160

This paper – which can be found here – provides an overview of the UK MasterCard litigation. Mr. Veljanowski is likely very well placed to discuss this:  he was one of the two economic experts involved in a case recently decided by the CAT on the matter. He also seems to publish a paper about every court decision concerning the MasterCard litigation (see my post of 24 March 2017, regarding the Arcadia v MasterCard case). The paper begins with a quick overview of the MasterCard litigation. As a result of the European Commission’s MasterCard decision, there are currently about 25 separate standalone and follow-on retailer actions making their way through the English courts concerning MasterCard and Visa’s card systems’ interchange fees. The first decision in these cases was adopted by the CAT last year (Sainsbury v MasterCard). The second one was the Arcadia v MasterCard case I posted about on 10 February. There are also more recent decisions by the…