Robert D. Anderson and Bill Kovacic ‘The application of competition policy vis-à-vis intellectual property rights: The evolution of thought underlying policy change’

This paper was written at the behest of the WTO, and can be found here. It examines the evolution of national competition policies and enforcement approaches vis-à-vis intellectual property rights (IPRs) in major jurisdictions over the past decades. I think it is particularly useful because it provides an integrated analysis of some of the most important developments at the intersection between competition and IP. A first section describes how the application of competition law in IP has been characterised over the last decades by the replacement of form-based approaches for case-by-case analyses of the effects of IP-related practices.  Furthermore, following a period in which competition authorities largely deferred to intellectual property offices with respect to issues concerning the scope and legitimacy of patents and other IPRs, leading agencies have devoted significant resources to advocacy efforts aimed at ensuring the integrity of patent regimes and avoiding the issuance/recognition of ill-founded rights that potentially weaken competition or impede follow-on innovation without serving valid…

Sandra Marco Colino, Niamh Dunne, Knut Fournier, Sofia Pais, Derek Ritzmann ‘The Lundbeck case and the Concept of Potential Competition’ (2017) Concurrences n° 2-2017

This paper – which can be found here – contains the reflections of a number of legal scholars about European decisions regarding reverse settlement payments (also known as “pay for delay” agreements). Reverse settlement payments consist of payments by the owner of IP rights to entities that are challenging such rights in court – and they are particularly important in the pharmaceutical sector, where producers of generic drugs may challenge the IP of branded drugs, and the owner of the drug may pay the generics’ company not to challenge his/her/its IP (and, thus, not to enter the market). As noted in the introduction: “Schemes of this nature are bound to set off alarm bells in the mind of the antitrust erudite. Delaying the entry of would-be competitors would almost certainly entail pushing back the benefits typically derived from a competitive market, the very ones that competition law was designed to protect. And yet the fact remains that, when reverse payment agreements are entered…