Patrick Actis Perinetto and Natalia Latronico ‘The Bitter Medicine: Competition Law and Parallel Trade in the Pharmaceutical Sector’ (2017) World Competition 40(10 93

This article – which you can find here –┬áis a rather straightforward piece on restrictions on parallel trade of pharmaceutical products as a competition law infringement. It begins by analysing the most relevant features of parallel trade in the pharmaceutical sector. In Europe, a prohibition of restrictions on cross-border trade under EU competition law is coupled with the fact that the main purchaser of pharmaceuticals are the member states, which are free to adopt their own approach with respect to pricing and public reimbursement. Given the resulting price differentials between member states, parallel trade occurs as wholesalers take advantage of the arbitrage possibilities by exporting products from a low-price country to a high-price one and pocketing the margins. Having established this, the paper moves into reviewing the main strategies used by companies to counter such parallel trade. Such practices include refusal to deal/prohibition of exports, vertical integration, quota systems and dual pricing schemes. The paper identifies each strategy in turn,…

Pedro Caro de Sousa ‘Free Movement and Competition in the European Market for Pharmaceuticals’ in in Pablo Figueroa and Alejandro Guerrero Perez (eds.) EU Competition and Trade Law in the Pharmaceutical Sector (Elgar), Chapter 13

This is a paper of mine – which you can find here – that looks at the interaction of free movement and competition law as regards the pharma sector in Europe. Very few industries are as profoundly influenced by regulation as the pharmaceutical industry. All aspects of the life-cycle of new drugs are regulated, from patent application, to marketing approval, commercial exploitation, patent expiration and competition with generics. The nature of demand for drugs, the identity of drugs brought to market, and the nature of competition in the drug market over time are all shaped by regulation. Throughout much of the world, administrative regulation, rather than competition policy, dominates efforts to afford consumers and governments adequate access to affordable drugs. As a result, the nature of competition in this market is sui generis. A significant number of infringements to competition law in this sphere across the world are concerned with practices that seek to take advantage of or manipulate the…