Inge Graef  ‘Algorithms and fairness: what role for competition law in targeting price discrimination towards end consumers?’

This paper – which can be found here –  tries to identify when algorithmic price discrimination will be anticompetitive. Price discrimination is not per se unlawful or anticompetitive; on the contrary, price discrimination  may be efficient and lead to increased output. However, personalised pricing is commonly felt to be unfair – and it is undisputed (in Europe, at least) that some forms of price discrimination can be anticompetitive. This paper seeks to distinguish between those situations when algorithmic price discrimination is anticompetitive and those in which it is not. The paper is structured as follows: Section 2 looks at how price discrimination can harm competition. Two types of harm are identified: (i) primary line injury occurs where the supplier’s conduct discriminates against competitors in markets in which the supplier also operates; and (ii) secondary line injury takes place when a supplier discriminates between a number of its customers as against one another. While behaviour giving rise to primary line injury…

Ioannis Lianos & Pierre Regibeau “Vexatious”/”Sham” Litigation: When can it Arise and How can it be Reduced?’ (2017) Antitrust Bulletin 62(4) 643-689

It is possible that companies may, through regulatory and litigation processes, be able to exclude or marginalize their competitors from the market and therefore charge higher prices, limit output, maintain the status quo price, or diminish innovation. But while these strategies may offer a cheap mechanism for non-price predation, litigation and regulatory process have been set up to protect public goods regardless of the risk that their use may negatively impact competition. Furthermore: ‘assessing on a case-by-case basis the welfare effects of each use of the regulatory and litigation process through some form of sophisticated cost benefit analysis would be too burdensome and would generate too much uncertainty, chilling the legitimate use of such governmental processes and thus frustrating their aims. For this reason, in practice, the use of the regulatory and/or litigation process stays presumptively outside the scope of competition law, through the operation of some form of antitrust immunity, in both the U.S. and in Europe, this being…

Steven Andeman ‘Overplaying the Innovation Card: Stronger Intellectual Property Rights and Competition Law’ Kritika: Essays on intellectual property (ed.) Peter Drahos, Gustavo Ghidini, Hanns Ullrich (Elgar, 2015) 17-58

This paper is already over two years old, but it provides a good overview of the main challenges that arise at the intersection of competition and IP law. The article’s thesis is that patents and copyrights seek to promote innovation by striking a balance between protecting initial inventor rights, on the one hand, and fostering follow-on or cumulative innovation, on the other. It conceptualises recent efforts to use competition law to limit the scope of IP law as attempts to limit excessive protections granted to original inventors by IP rights to the detriment of follow-on innovation. Examples of such interventions in Europe include compulsory copyright licensing remedies, the sanctioning of certain attempts to manipulate the IP regime in order to extend the scope and duration of existing IP rights, the prohibition of pay-for delay agreements, and the use of competition law to limit reliance by Standard Essential Patent (SEP) holders on patent injunctions. The paper is structured as follows: Section…

Cento Veljanowski “Credit Cards, Counterfactuals, and Antitrust Damages” Journal of European Competition Law & Practice (2018) 9(3) 146–160

This paper – which can be found here – provides an overview of the UK MasterCard litigation. Mr. Veljanowski is likely very well placed to discuss this:  he was one of the two economic experts involved in a case recently decided by the CAT on the matter. He also seems to publish a paper about every court decision concerning the MasterCard litigation (see my post of 24 March 2017, regarding the Arcadia v MasterCard case). The paper begins with a quick overview of the MasterCard litigation. As a result of the European Commission’s MasterCard decision, there are currently about 25 separate standalone and follow-on retailer actions making their way through the English courts concerning MasterCard and Visa’s card systems’ interchange fees. The first decision in these cases was adopted by the CAT last year (Sainsbury v MasterCard). The second one was the Arcadia v MasterCard case I posted about on 10 February. There are also more recent decisions by the…

Pierre Huizing ‘Fining Foreign Effects: A New Frontier of Extraterritorial Cartel Enforcement in Europe?’ (2017) World Competition 40(3) 365

This paper – which can be found here – asks whether national competition agencies in Europe (NCAs) have the power to sanction anticompetitive activity taking place outside their territory. The question went unaddressed in Regulation 1/2003, which set up the system of decentralized competition enforcement currently in place in the EU. According to this paper, the members of the European Competition Network (ECN) used to proceed on the basis of a common understanding that each authority would only pursue cross-border cartels for their domestic effects – with the Commission pursuing EU-wide cartels. However, in recent cases some NCAs have departed from this practice and imposed fines that took into account the EU-wide effects of cartels. This article reviews the NCA’s practice as regards the sanctioning of extra-territorial cartel activity, and the academic and political debate about whether this practice is legitimate and appropriate. It does so as follows: Section 2 reviews the enforcement practices of a number of NCAs. It…

Sandra Marco Colino, Niamh Dunne, Knut Fournier, Sofia Pais, Derek Ritzmann ‘The Lundbeck case and the Concept of Potential Competition’ (2017) Concurrences n° 2-2017

This paper – which can be found here – contains the reflections of a number of legal scholars about European decisions regarding reverse settlement payments (also known as “pay for delay” agreements). Reverse settlement payments consist of payments by the owner of IP rights to entities that are challenging such rights in court – and they are particularly important in the pharmaceutical sector, where producers of generic drugs may challenge the IP of branded drugs, and the owner of the drug may pay the generics’ company not to challenge his/her/its IP (and, thus, not to enter the market). As noted in the introduction: “Schemes of this nature are bound to set off alarm bells in the mind of the antitrust erudite. Delaying the entry of would-be competitors would almost certainly entail pushing back the benefits typically derived from a competitive market, the very ones that competition law was designed to protect. And yet the fact remains that, when reverse payment agreements are entered…

Unwired v Huawei [2017] EWHC 711 (Pat)

This judgment – which you can find here – is a recent UK court decision on FRAND terms. The factual background to this decision is convoluted (including five “technical” trials relating to the validity and infringement/essentiality of the relevant patents, which preceded the present trial regarding all competition law and FRAND issues), but the situation can be summarised shortly. Unwired Planet is a company that owns a number of worldwide patents, including many of the foundational technologies that allow mobile devices to connect to the Internet (4G, 3G and the like) – most of the relevant portfolio in this case was acquired from Ericsson. A number of these patents are essential to the relevant technical standards, and are thus deemed Standards Essential Patents (“SEPs”). The process of standardisation involves holders of patents which are essential to an international telecommunications standard declaring them to be essential to the relevant standards body –  in this case, the European  Telecommunications Standards Institute (“ETSI”). Standard…

Alison Jones ‘ Antitrust Appraisal of Vertical Agreements in the ASEAN Economic Community’ in Ong (ed.) The Regionalisation of Competition Law and Policy within the ASEAN Economic Community (2018, CUP)

This paper – which you can find here – looks at the different approaches to vertical agreements across ASEAN. The paper draws on practice and experience in the US and EU to consider whether, and if so how, the approach to vertical agreements under the competition law systems of ASEAN countries should be changed in order to ensure a more coherent policy across the region. Following an introduction, Section 2 examines how divergent national policies towards vertical agreements in ASEAN might be damaging competition, efficiency and market integration, and why greater convergence around a harmonised framework might be desirable. It begins by reviewing the outlines of the ASEAN single market and by assessing the role of competition law for its development. It devotes particular attention to the treatment of vertical agreements, which are subject to a spectrum of radically different approaches across the region – from only vertical agreements by dominant companies being subject to competition law in Singapore and…

Wouter Wils ‘Private Enforcement of EU Antitrust Law and Its Relationship with Public Enforcement: Past, Present and Future’ (2017) World Competition 40(1) 3

This paper – which can be found here – provides a short history of private enforcement of EU antitrust law and of its relationship with public enforcement. The paper is structured as follows: Chapter 2 looks at the situation before 2003, a period during which courts established that the Treaty’s competition provisions have direct effect and create rights for individuals, even as public enforcement predominated. Chapter 3 reviews the changes brought about by Regulation 1/2003, that allowed NCAs and national courts to fully implement competition law (up until then, the system required exceptions under Art. 101(3), which concerns efficiencies, to be approved by the European Commission). This Regulation contained a number of provisions that: (i) in line with Masterfoods, obliged NCAs and national courts to follow prior Commission decisions on antitrust infringements; and (ii) set up mechanisms for cooperation between the European Commission, NCAs and national courts concerning the private enforcement of antitrust rules. However, Regulation 1/2003 ultimately led to increased…

Alison Jones and William E. Kovacic ‘Identifying Anticompetitive Agreements in the United States and the European Union – Developing a Coherent Antitrust Analytical Framework’ (2017) Antitrust Bulletin 62(2) 254

This is a very substantial paper on the appropriate analytical framework for identifying anticompetitive agreements . It can be found here. The paper focuses on how the debate on rules and standards, and on the balance of Type I and Type II errors, affects the analytical framework for identifying infringing agreements in the US and EU. From their standpoint, these debates have been influential in discussions about how to identify anticompetitive unilateral practices and mergers, but have not been relevant for similar discussions regarding horizontal agreements. Also, from their point of view: “the question of how agreements are to be analysed under both the US and the EU jurisprudence is also unduly opaque; it is frequently difficult to ascertain whether agreements, including joint venture and other horizontal collaboration and distribution agreements, are compatible with the law. In particular, confusion about the role and scope of per se rules, the role and scope of ancillary restraint doctrines, and how competing anti- and…