Jonathan Baker and Fiona Scott Morton on ‘Antitrust Enforcement against Platform MFNs’ (2018) Yale Law Journal 127 2176

 . This paper, available here, argues for more vigorous antitrust enforcement against Most Favoured Nation (MFN) provisions in the platform context. A MFN clause requires providers to refrain from offering their products or services at lower prices on other platforms. During the past two decades, antitrust enforcement against MFN provisions has grown, particularly in Europe. In contrast, there have been almost no enforcement actions against platform MFNs in the United States. The authors make a number of proposals to reverse this trend. The article is structured as follows: Part I shows how platform MFNs can harm competition and consumers, despite their potential competitive benefits. The authors’ draw on the economics’ literature on the effects of MFNs generally, and platform MFNs in particular. Simple MFNs commit sellers not to discount selectively, which assures covered buyers that they will be charged the lowest price offered by the seller. At first blush, one might expect this provision to lead to lower prices for covered buyers….

Chiara Caccinelli and Joëlle Toledano, focuses ‘Assessing Anticompetitive Practices in Two-sided Markets: The Booking.com cases’ (2018) Journal of Competition Law & Economics 14(2) 193

This paper, which can be found here, aims to shed light on the different approaches adopted by different European antitrust authorities to assess the allegedly anticompetitive MFN practices of a platform operating in a two-sided market. This is done by means of a law-and-economics analysis of the different approaches to Booking.com by competition authorities in France, Germany, Italy and Sweden, with an eye to discussing the specific difficulties raised by two-side market economics. The paper is structured as follows: Section II presents the key features of two-sided markets economics. Two-sided markets present some peculiar traits, which distinguish them from more “traditional” markets. Firms operating in these markets serve more than one group of consumers simultaneously and offer them the opportunity, as well as an interface, for fruitful exchanges. These value-enhancing interactions generate important direct and indirect network externalities among the groups, which platforms would typically aim to internalise. As a result, platform profitability depends not so much on the price level…

Jerome Pouyet and Thomas Trégouët ‘Assessing The Impact Of Vertical Integration in Platform Markets’ (2018) Competition Policy International Antitrust Chronicle December

This technical economics paper, which can be found here, argues that, in the context of vertical mergers, indirect network effects create a form of demand complementarity downstream that softens the anticompetitive effects of vertical integration. At the same time, vertical integration creates various sources of market power. How such market power is exerted, and its impact on competition, depends on how the integrated firm balances its price instruments to harness indirect network effects. This depends, in turn, on how each side of the market values the participation of users from the other side, or, in short, the structure of indirect network effects. The authors show, in particular, that there is no systematic correlation between stronger upstream market power and foreclosure of competitors or consumer harm. The paper is structured as follows: Section II introduces a framework to analyse vertical integration with two-sided network effects. The literature on vertical integration between an upstream input supplier and a downstream manufacturer has highlighted…

Rennato Nazzini ‘Fresh evidence on appeal in two-tier administrative enforcement systems’ and Despoina Mantzari ‘Navigating the admission of evidence on appeal’ (2018) Journal of Antitrust Enforcement 6(2) 281

A second and third paper contain a discussion between two scholars – Rennato Nazzini and Despoina Mantzari – on whether an appellant should be able to introduce fresh evidence during a judicial review before a court. The discussion concerns a decision by the UK’s Competition Appeal Tribunal (CAT) in Ping Europe Ltd v Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) – the CAT’s first decision on the admission of new evidence in appeal proceedings on the basis of rule 21(2) of the CAT Rules 2015. This was a ruling on an application by the CMA to exclude certain evidence adduced by Ping that, in the CMA’s view, Ping could and should have adduced during the administrative proceedings. The facts were as follow. The CMA claimed that Ping had infringed the Chapter I prohibition and Article 101 TFEU by prohibiting online sales of its golf equipment. In response to the statement of objections (SO), Ping argued, among other things, that its prohibition on…

Markus Reisinger ‘Asics vs Coty: Competitive effects of selective distribution systems in light of diverging court decisions’

Selective distribution systems are usually put in place in place to ensure that authorized distributors fulfil a certain quality standard, thereby avoiding losses in consumers’ brand valuation. Selective distribution systems often include clauses that allow manufactures to achieve better channel coordination in terms of prices, advertising, services, etc. A common way to do so is to restrict their selective retailers in advertising or pricing practices (e.g. to ensure that advertising campaigns or sales are coordinated). The paper – which can be found here – looks at recent German and EU cases on selective distribution systems, and tries to understand the differences between them. In the Asics case, the German Bundeskartellamt (BKartA) ruled that a selective distribution system by sport shoe manufacturer Asics, which included restrictions regarding online advertisement and price search engines, infringed competition law. By contrast, in the Coty case the European Court of Justice ruled that relatively similar clauses in the selective distribution system of a beauty products manufacturer were…

Maria José Schmidt-Kessen ‘Selective Distribution Systems in EU Competition and EU Trademark Law: Resolving the Tension’ (2018) Journal of European Competition Law & Practice 9(5) 304

The basic argument of this paper – which can be found here – is that the ECJ in Coty reversed its earlier judgment in Pierre Fabre as regards luxury products, in order to ensure that the treatment of selective distribution systems under EU trademark and competition law was aligned. A first section provides an overview of the treatment of online selling restrictions under European competition law. Some luxury brands fear that retailers might damage their valuable brands’ reputation by offering branded goods in an inadequate online environment, e.g. without adequate costumer service; and that allowing online sales by retailers could lead to an increase in trade of counterfeited goods over the internet. As such, they have imposed on their retailers considerable restrictions on the possibility of using the internet as a selling channel, often in the context of selective distribution systems. These restrictions have led to competition law cases being brought against manufacturers who impose them. These cases build on…

Giuseppe Colangelo and Valerio Torti, looks at ‘Selective Distribution and Online Marketplace Restrictions under EU Competition Rules after Coty Prestige’ (2018) European Competition Journal 14 (1) 81

This paper – which can be found here – looks at the Coty decision, and it structured as follows: Section 2 provides an overview of how EU competition law dealt with selective distribution systems pre-Coty. It begins by looking at the Metro decisions. In Metro I, the CJEU decided that the maintenance of a certain price level for specialist retailers and wholesalers was a legitimate goal. In this decision, the CJEU recognised that that selective distribution agreements are compatible with competition rules if they fulfil three cumulative conditions: (i) the characteristics of the product in question necessitate such a distribution scheme in order to preserve its quality or to ensure its proper use; (ii) resellers are chosen on the basis of objective criteria of a qualitative nature relating to the technical qualifications of the reseller and his staff and the suitability of his trading premises, laid down uniformly for all potential resellers and not applied in a discriminatory fashion; (iii) the…

Alison Jones ‘ Antitrust Appraisal of Vertical Agreements in the ASEAN Economic Community’ in Ong (ed.) The Regionalisation of Competition Law and Policy within the ASEAN Economic Community (2018, CUP)

This paper – which you can find here – looks at the different approaches to vertical agreements across ASEAN. The paper draws on practice and experience in the US and EU to consider whether, and if so how, the approach to vertical agreements under the competition law systems of ASEAN countries should be changed in order to ensure a more coherent policy across the region. Following an introduction, Section 2 examines how divergent national policies towards vertical agreements in ASEAN might be damaging competition, efficiency and market integration, and why greater convergence around a harmonised framework might be desirable. It begins by reviewing the outlines of the ASEAN single market and by assessing the role of competition law for its development. It devotes particular attention to the treatment of vertical agreements, which are subject to a spectrum of radically different approaches across the region – from only vertical agreements by dominant companies being subject to competition law in Singapore and…

Ariel Ezrachi ‘The Ripple Effects of Online Marketplace Bans’ (2017) World Competition 40(1) 47

This paper – which you can find here – assesses the economic and legal implications of online marketplace bans in order to determine what treatment they should be subject to under competition law. The discussion opens in Chapter 2 with a review of different types of online marketplaces. Online marketplaces bring together large numbers of sellers and buyers, and in doing so facilitate dynamic competition, both in relation to greater inter-brand competition and in relation to intra-brand competition. Nonetheless, there are various types of such marketplaces, which could be distinguished on the basis of their particular characteristics. These include: (a) whether online marketplaces are pure or hybrid intermediaries (pure intermediaries are merely platforms for buyers and sellers, while hybrid intermediaries provide a sales platform but also act as retailers on their own platform); (b) open or closed marketplaces (any seller can gain access to an open marketplace, while closed marketplaces impose access restrictions); (iii) the type and quality of the interface on…