Jose Luis da Cruz Vilaca on ‘The intensity of judicial review in complex economic matters – recent competition law judgments of the Court of Justice of the EU’ (2018) Journal of Antitrust Enforcement 6(2) 173–188

The author of this paper, available here, was for a long time the President of the Court of First Instance (now the ECJ’s General Court). More importantly for our purposes here, he was also the CJEU judge responsible for drafting the Intel judgment. The paper is structured as follows: A first section reviews how EU courts approach judicial review in complex matters, and how this approach has evolved over time. For a number of years, the Court of Justice (ECJ) has taken a careful approach to the scope and intensity of review of Commission decisions as regards complex economic matters. From the outset, the Court conceived its role in competition matters as being limited to reviewing legality, and not as involving unlimited jurisdiction or full merits review (except as regards the imposition of fines). Since Consten & Grunding in 1966, the ECJ has acknowledged that the Commission must engage in complex evaluations of economic matters. The judicial review of these evaluations…

Rennato Nazzini ‘Fresh evidence on appeal in two-tier administrative enforcement systems’ and Despoina Mantzari ‘Navigating the admission of evidence on appeal’ (2018) Journal of Antitrust Enforcement 6(2) 281

A second and third paper contain a discussion between two scholars – Rennato Nazzini and Despoina Mantzari – on whether an appellant should be able to introduce fresh evidence during a judicial review before a court. The discussion concerns a decision by the UK’s Competition Appeal Tribunal (CAT) in Ping Europe Ltd v Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) – the CAT’s first decision on the admission of new evidence in appeal proceedings on the basis of rule 21(2) of the CAT Rules 2015. This was a ruling on an application by the CMA to exclude certain evidence adduced by Ping that, in the CMA’s view, Ping could and should have adduced during the administrative proceedings. The facts were as follow. The CMA claimed that Ping had infringed the Chapter I prohibition and Article 101 TFEU by prohibiting online sales of its golf equipment. In response to the statement of objections (SO), Ping argued, among other things, that its prohibition on…

The OECD Report on International Private Enforcement

Officially known as ‘Individual and Collective Private Enforcement of Competition Law: Insights for Mexico in 2018’, this Report was prepared with a view to advise Mexico on how to reform its private enforcement regime. The Report can be found here. Advising Mexico in this regard required the pursuit of a comprehensive overview of international experiences with private competition enforcement – with a focus on Europe and North America, but also looking beyond these regions. This project also required the identification of the various elements that comprise private enforcement regimes around the world, the various forms that each of these elements may take, and how these elements relate to one another. I may of course be mistaken, but I think there is no other work like this in the market. As such, I circulate the Report here because I think it can provide a useful reference for anyone working or interested in private enforcement.

Jurisdictional Clauses and Abuses of a Dominant Position – Case C‑595/17 Apple ECLI:EU:C:2018:854

This review concerns the judgment of 24 October by the CJEU on whether generally worded jurisdiction clauses cover claims of abuse of a dominant position brought by one party to a contract against the other (Case C‑595/17 Apple ECLI:EU:C:2018:854). The interpretation of generally worded jurisdiction clauses, and whether they extend to cartel claims, was the topic of a couple of articles that I reviewed a few weeks ago here and here. Facts The case concerns a distribution contract entered into between Apple and eBizcuss (the ‘authorised reseller’ or ‘distributor’) which contained a jurisdiction clause conferring jurisdiction on the Irish courts. The clause read as follows: ‘This Agreement and the corresponding relationship between the parties shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the Republic of Ireland and the parties shall submit to the jurisdiction of the courts of the Republic of Ireland.’ In 2012, the authorised reseller brought proceedings before the tribunal de commerce de Paris…

Michael J. Frese ‘Civil Liability for Single and Continuous Infringements’ (2018) World Competition 41 (2) 179

Infringement decisions by competition authorities in Europe provide irrefutable, or at least prima facie evidence of antitrust violations in follow-on cases brought before national courts. This binding effect of infringement decisions is meant to ease the burden on injured parties seeking to obtain damages. Evidentiary rules applicable to investigations thus have a bearing on the outcome of civil litigation and the scope of potential damages exposure. The single and continuous infringement (SCI) is an example of such an evidentiary rule. This legal construct alleviates the burden on competition authorities to prove individual details of cartels whose membership and activities may have evolved over time. However, appropriate limiting principles are required to ensure that defendants are not paying for harm they have not caused or could not have prevented. This article, available here, discusses the evidentiary value of single and continuous infringement findings in follow on damages litigation, and explores the available limiting principles. It is structured as follows: After the introduction,…

Joshua P. Davis and Robert H. Lande on ‘Restoring the Legitimacy of Private Antitrust Enforcement’ in A Report to the 45th President of the United States (American Antitrust Institute’s Transition Report on Competition Policy), Chapter 6, page 219

This report, which can be found here, argues against the increasingly prevalent view that class actions are little more than legalised blackmail, and that class action lawyers are ambulance chasers rather than private attorneys general. The paper submits that there is no systematic empirical support for the view that frivolous antitrust litigation is a serious problem, and present a defence of the benefits of private antitrust enforcement. The paper is structured as follows: A first section argues that private antitrust cases are a critical component of effective antitrust enforcement. Government cannot be expected to do all or even most of the necessary competition enforcement. In addition to budgetary constraints, there are a number of reasons for this – including “undue fear of losing cases; lack of awareness of industry conditions; overly suspicious views about complaints by ‘losers’ that they were in fact victims of anticompetitive behavior; higher turnover among government attorneys; and the unfortunate, but undeniable, reality that government enforcement (or…

Ariel Ezrachi on ‘EU Competition Law Goals and The Digital Economy’ (2018) Report for BEUC – The European Consumer Organisation

This paper – which can be found here – remarks that questions regarding whether certain conducts pose competition problems have become increasingly common in the face of new business strategies, new forms of interaction with consumers, the accumulation of data and the use of big analytics. It argues that answers can only be provided by taking into account the goals and legal framework of specific competition regimes. The author focuses on the EU. The paper thus outlines the goals and values of European Competition law, and looks at how they apply to digital markets. The report is structured as follows: The paper begins with an introduction to the constitutional foundations of European Competition law. Competition policy is one of several instruments used to advance the goals of the European Treaties. In this context, competition rules must be interpreted in the light of the wider normative values of the EU. These are not limited to economic goals such as promoting consumer welfare, but…

Makam Delrahim (Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division, U.S. DoJ) ‘Antitrust Enforcement in the Digital Era’

In these remarks, hich can be found here, AAG Delrahim defends the ‘broad antitrust consensus that still reigns today’ and considers how it might apply to the digital sphere. He begins by outlining the two key components of the current antitrust consensus. The first is the consumer welfare standard, which requires that some business practices should be condemned as unlawful only where they harm competition in such a way that consumers suffer. The second component is “evidence-based enforcement”. Outside the realm of naked horizontal restraints such as price fixing, bid rigging, and market allocation, antitrust demands evidence of harm or likely harm to competition, often weighed against efficiencies or procompetitive justifications. Evidence-based enforcement also requires a readiness to adapt our existing antitrust framework and tools to new or emerging threats to competition. One such threat comes from digital platforms and the increased market concentration they give rise to. AGG Delrahim considers that the antitrust consensus approach is flexible to new business…

Tim Wu ‘After Consumer Welfare, now what? The ‘Protection of Competition’ Standard in Practice (2018) CPI Antitrust Chronicle April

The goal of this short piece, which can be found here, is to address arguments that abandoning the ‘consumer welfare’ standard would make antitrust law too unworkable and indeterminate. The paper argues that there is an alternative standard ‘protection of competition’ that is practicable and at least as predictable as the consumer welfare standard. This standard has the additional advantage of being much truer to the legislative intent underlying US antitrust laws than the consumer welfare standard. The piece is structured as follows The first section provides an overview of the two main criticisms of current antitrust practice. Critics of current antitrust practice are committed to antitrust revival, and broadly opposed to the extremes of the Chicago. However, they then divide as regards their approach to the “consumer welfare” standard. The first group – comprising mainly economist and lawyers – believes that the standard has been abused and misused, but nonetheless retains its utility as the anchor of antitrust law and policy….

Jonathan B. Baker, Jonathan Sallet & Fiona Scott Morton ‘Introduction: Unlocking Antitrust Enforcement’ (2018) Yale Law Journal 127(7) 1916

This piece is the introduction to a special issue by the Yale Law Journal on ‘Antitrust Enforcement’. I shall review a number of these articles in forthcoming posts. In the introduction, the authors begin by describing the context in which this special issue of the Yale Law Journal was published. This context is not dissimilar to that which led to the adoption of antitrust rules in the first place:  there is a market power problem which may contribute to slow economic growth and to widening economic inequality. This issue of the Journal tries to lay the foundation for an overarching enforcement agenda ‘in the long, but receding, shadow of the Chicago School, which brought economic analysis to the forefront of antitrust but failed to fully capture the realities of competition and the private actions that can curb it”. This small piece also explains the basic underpinnings of this new enforcement agenda. In particular, they consider that: “Economic analysis lies at…