Vincenzo Denicolò and Michele Polo ‘The innovation theory of harm: An appraisal’ IEFE Working Papers 103

The relationship between competition and innovation has been explored by a large amount of literature, both theoretical and empirical. Despite this, general results remain elusive. In the light of this, antitrust authorities have generally refrained from taking extreme stances and followed a cautious approach. Intervention has been limited mainly to cases in which the merging firms’ innovative products are close to the commercialisation stage, where  innovation outcomes have been regarded as sufficiently predictable as to be amenable to standard analysis. But policy seems to be changing. The European Commission has gradually shifted the focus of its dynamic merger analysis from product pipelines to “innovation markets or spaces”. This article, available here, argues that the theoretical foundations of innovation theories of harm are too fragile to provide the bases for radical policy changes. Antitrust authorities and the courts should continue to consider the impact of horizontal mergers on innovation by bearing in mind that effects can go either way. Section 2…

Bruno Jullien and Yassine Lefouili ‘Horizontal Mergers and Innovation’ (2018) Journal of Competition Law & Economics 14(3) 364

This is another example of an early paper criticising the assumptions of those arguing for more stringent enforcement against mergers that may affect innovation – this time focusing on the potential for efficiencies brought about by such mergers. While not new, the debate on the effect of mergers on innovation has been particularly lively in Europe since the European Commission’s broadened its innovation theory of harm, starting with Dow/DuPont. The reasons behind this debate lie in the opposite effects that mergers can have on firms’ incentives to invest in R&D. This paper, available here, argues that merger control should be a priori neutral as to the innovation effects of horizontal mergers, since the overall effect of a merger on innovation can be either positive or negative depending on the circumstances. The paper further identifies a number of key factors which influence the impact of mergers on innovation. In particular, it suggests that a positive relationship between mergers and innovation is…

Jorge Padilla on ‘Revisiting the Horizontal Mergers and Innovation Policy Debate’ (2019) Journal of European Competition Law & Practice 10(6) 370

The Dow/DuPont merger launched an economic debate about the effects of horizontal mergers on innovation. Underpinning these debates are a number of points of agreement, beginning with consensus over the debate on the relationship between competition and innovation not being directly transferable to the effect of horizontal mergers. There are also a number of shared conclusions regarding merging firms’ ability and incentive to innovate when those firms compete in developing new products (product innovation) or in reducing their costs (process innovation). Such mergers may give rise to various efficiencies and increase the merging parties’ ability to innovate, but they can also influence the parties’ incentives to engage in R&D and implement their innovations. Ultimately, whether a merger leads to more innovation will depend on the nature and relative magnitude of the positive and negative externalities that the investments made by one party generate on the other. Where there seems to be no agreement, however, is on the implications of the…