Makan Delrahim ‘Merricks v MasterCard: ‘Passing On’ the US Experience’ (2020) Competition Policy International, May Column

Over the past few years, in addition to cooperating with international counterparts in many cases, the DoJ has made efforts to further common understandings on a variety of substantive and procedural antitrust issues. Developments in competition law, both substantive and procedural, can be driven by courts, particularly in countries that allow for private antitrust enforcement in the form of class actions. The upcoming decision of the UK Supreme Court in Merricks v. MasterCard is of interest to competition enforcers around the world because it involves novel questions on the proper approach to certification of an opt-out collective action — akin to a class action in the United States — brought by indirect purchasers. This essay, available here, aims to share the United States’ experiences confronting similar questions to those faced by the UK Supreme Court in this case – in particular, how the class representative can show “a realistic prospect of establishing loss on a class-wide basis,” and what should…

Michael D. Hausfeld, Irving Scher and Laurence T. Sorkin ‘In Defense of Class Actions: A Response to Makan Delrahim’s Commentary on the UK MasterCard Case’ (2020) Competition Policy International June

This article, available here, was written by lawyers of a US firm that is, in its own words, a ‘global leader on claimant focused competition damages practice’, enabling victims of anticompetitive conduct to obtain damages for harm suffered. This law firm acts for an intervenor, the Consumers’ Association, in the UK MasterCard proceedings that led to the US DoJ sending a letter to the UK’s Supreme Court. This piece is – as the title indicates – a reaction to that letter. The paper begins by framing the issue. The DoJ AAG’s letter to the UK Supreme Court provides an overview of class actions in the US. The authors agree with the general overview of Rule 23 provided by the Division. For example, few would argue with the proposition that, in the antitrust context, indirect purchaser class actions raise more difficult questions of commonality, impact, and manageability than direct purchaser class actions, even though harm may have been sustained at both…