Harry First and Stephen Webber Wallace ‘Pairing Public and Private Antitrust Remedies’ in Albert A. Foer Liber Amicorum, Concurrences (Forthcoming)

Discussions on private competition remedies most often deal with questions of optimal deterrence and effectiveness. Lost in conversation is the basic idea that antitrust violations cause economic harm, and that those victimised by that harm should be entitled to damages from those who have violated the law. This is the underappreciated compensatory function of antitrust. Section 4A of the Clayton Act is a powerful, yet historically underused enforcement tool that empowers the United States to obtain treble damages for anticompetitive conduct when the government is itself the victim. The paper, which can be found here, focuses on whether the US government should not only pursue public enforcement activities, but also engage in private enforcement claims to be compensated for losses as a result of anticompetitive conduct. It examines the limited use of Section 4A, and discusses some possibilities for future cooperation between public and private plaintiffs that could advance the compensatory goal of antitrust. It is structured as follows: Section I looks…

Miriam C. Buitem ‘The Ambivalent Effect of Antitrust Damages on Deterrence’ (2019) CPI Antitrust Chronicle Ju

The possible undermining effect of damages actions on leniency programs has been hotly debated. The concern is that the prospect of damages claims may discourage colluding firms from applying for leniency, since the leniency program only shields them from public fines, not from civil damages. Civil damages may contribute to the goal of preventing cartels by increasing the expected costs of starting a cartel. However, civil damages may not enhance antitrust deterrence if colluding firms believe it to be unlikely that competition authorities will detect their cartel. For leniency programs to put cartel members in a prisoners’ dilemma, confessing must be more attractive than staying quiet. If civil damages are substantial, leniency may not sufficiently improve a colluding firms’ position as compared to their non-reporting co-conspirators, and hence their incentive to apply for leniency will decrease, together with the overall odds of cartel detection. This note, available here, discusses the ambivalent effect of antitrust damages actions on deterrence. It considers how fines…

Nicole Rosenboom and Daan in ’t Veld ‘The Interaction of Public and Private Cartel Enforcement’ (2019) World Competition 42(1) 87

Despite its broad title, this article – available here – investigates mainly the interaction between leniency programmes and civil damages claims.  Most competition authorities have adopted leniency programmes to uncover cartels. To increase the overall deterrent effect of competition law, many jurisdictions have also introduced private competition enforcement, which increases the total potential financial exposure of cartel members. The impact of private competition enforcement – and particularly the concomitant increase in the liability of potential leniency applicants – on leniency programmes has been discussed in the literature, but there is an absence of empirical studies. This article tries to fill this gap by studying the empirical impact of private competition enforcement on leniency. It uses two methods: surveys of Dutch firms and competition lawyers, and econometric conjoint analysis. The authors conclude that firms’ decisions to apply for leniency are affected by the magnitude of the personal penalty to which directors are subject and the amount of fine reduction following a successful leniency application….