Marco Botta and Klaus Wiedemann ‘EU Competition Law Enforcement vis-à-vis Exploitative Conducts in the Data Economy’ Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper No. 18-08

This long paper (90 pages), which can be found here, seeks to understand how traditional principles of EU law – particularly those related to exploitative abuses and respective remedies – apply to new business models that mainly rely on processing large amounts of users’ data. The analysis does not extend to the US because, following Trinko, the authors consider that antitrust law there does not extend to exploitative practices, even if the FTC has powers under the Sherman Act to pursue such practices under consumer and unfair practices law. I am afraid the review is rather long, because this paper’s contents are the equivalent of multiple articles. The paper is structured as follows: Section 2 provides an overview of European case law vis-à-vis exploitative abuses. Art. 102 TFEU lists a number of exploitative abuses. Nevertheless, the European Commission has long focused on investigating exclusionary, rather than exploitative abuses. While this has led to limited case law on exploitative abuses, the authors identify…

Ariel Ezrachi on ‘EU Competition Law Goals and The Digital Economy’ (2018) Report for BEUC – The European Consumer Organisation

This paper  can be found here. I have already reviewed it in an earlier post. At the time, I focused on the article’s overview of the goals of EU competition law. However, the article also contained a detailed discussion of the impact that the digital economy may have on these goals. I was unable to review this discussion then, so I propose to do it here. Competition policy is one of several instruments used to advance the goals of the European Treaties. According to the European Commission, competition on the market is protected as a means of enhancing consumer welfare and of ensuring an efficient allocation of resources. This notwithstanding, EU competition law has also consistently been held to protect ‘not only the interests of competitors or of consumers, but also the structure of the market and, in so doing, competition as such.’ Moreover, a genuinely indigenous objective is worthy of note, namely that of promoting European market integration. In addition…

Philippe Aghion, Stefan Bechtold, Lea Cassar and Holger Herz ‘The Causal Effects of Competition on Innovation: Experimental Evidence’ (2018) The Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization 34(2) 162

This paper, which can be found here, adds to the literature on the relationship between competition and innovation, which has been the subject of longstanding attention by economists. However, existing empirical studies on competition and innovation suffer from a number of limitations. The authors seek to address these limitations as regards a specific type of innovation models – so called ‘Step-by-Step Innovation Models’. Their study shows that, as long as key assumptions of the step-by-step innovation model are met, theoretical predictions of this model are confirmed by laboratory empirical data. Section 2 looks at ‘Step-by-Step Innovation Models’. The main characteristic of step-by-step innovation models when compared with previous Schumpeterian models (where competition is for the market) is that innovation incentives do not depend on post-innovation rents only, but rather on the difference between post-innovation and pre-innovation rents of incumbent firms. In the basic model setup, an industry consists of two firms which produce the same good and compete over selling the…