Mark A. Lemley and Timothy Simcoe ‘How Essential Are Standard-Essential Patents?

This working paper, which can be found here, seeks to understand what happens when standard essential patents (SEPs) are litigated in court. The authors find that, contrary to expectations, courts are more likely to find that SEPs are valid patents than a matched set of litigated non-SEP patents. However, courts are also significantly less likely to find that SEPs were infringed. One of the reason for this seems to be that many SEPs are asserted in court by non-practicing entities (NPEs), and NPEs do much worse in court than other patent holders. This has interesting implications for policy debates about both SEPs and NPEs. Standard-essential patents may not be so essential after all, perhaps because companies tend to err on the size of over-disclosing patents to standard-setting organisations. On the other hand, the failure of NPEs to win cases concerning the validity of what are, prima facie, a strong set of patents raises interesting questions about the role that NPEs play…

Noel Maurer and Stephen Haber ‘An Empirical Analysis of the Patent Troll Hypothesis: Evidence from Publicly-Traded Firms’ (2018) Hoover Institution Working Paper no. 17003

Do firms that earn revenues from licensing their patent portfolios, rather than producing physical products – often referred to as patent assertion entities (PAEs) or, more disparagingly as ‘patent trolls’ – frustrate or facilitate innovation? According to one view, PAEs purchase specious intellectual property and then file frivolous lawsuits in order to extort revenues from operating companies that would rather settle than go through the expense of litigation. The revenues earned by PAEs are therefore a tax on innovation: dollars that would be spent on R&D by operating companies are diverted to non-productive uses. A business model based on using low value patents to file frivolous lawsuits for their nuisance value, with little risk of being countersued, should yield easy returns—and a high yield, low risk business model that is not characterized by barriers to entry should proliferate rapidly. It follows, accordingly, that PAEs are a systemic threat to innovation, economic growth, and consumer welfare, and thus the laws governing…

Antitrust Writing Awards – OECD Nominations

A number of papers issuing from the OECD have been nominated for the Antitrust Writing Awards by ‘Concurrences’. This is a good occasion to read a number of very interesting pieces published last year, and for voting for the ones you enjoy the most. You can find all the nominated pieces here. Among these pieces, you will find: The OECD’s ‘Market Study Guide for Competition Authorities’. You can find it and vote for it here. The OECD’s work on ‘Rethinking Antitrust Tools for Multi-sided Platforms’. You can find it and vote for it here. Both were nominated for the ‘Soft Law’ category. An article of mine on private enforcement, recently published by the Common Market Law Review, on ‘EU and National Approaches to Passing on and Causation in Competition Damages Cases’. You can find it and vote for it here.

Thomas Vinje ‘Intellectual Property and Antitrust Review (3rd Edition) – Chapter 5 – European Union’ (The Law Reviews, 2018)

The task of the book to which this chapter belongs is to provide an annual practical overview of developments on the relationship between antitrust and intellectual property. This chapter, which can be found here, describes the competition / IP law interface in Europe. It is structured as follows: Section II is devoted to a review of developments that took place in 2017. The section begins with a succinct description of the Google cases, before turning to a discussion on standard essential patents (SEPs). It also reviews the European Commission’s Communication on ‘Setting out the EU approach to Standard Essential Patents’. The paper then briefly discusses e-commerce. It begins by mentioning the ECJ’s Coty decision and the Policy Brief prepared by the European Commission concerning this judgment. This Brief states that Coty provides more clarity and legal certainty to market participants by confirming previous case law and establishing a clear legal framework for online commerce. The paper also mentions the Commission’s e-commerce sector…

Jorge Padilla, Douglas H. Ginsburg and Koren W. Wong-Ervin ‘Antitrust Analysis Involving Intellectual Property and Standards: Implications from Economics’ (forthcoming, George Mason Law Review)

The paper, which can be found here, provides an overview of the economics of innovation and IP protection, licensing, and compulsory licensing, with specific applications to standards development and standard-essential patents. The authors also propose principles based on their economic analysis that courts and antitrust agencies can apply at each stage of an antitrust inquiry. The paper concludes with a summary of the approach to IP applied in China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, and the United States. The paper covers a lot of ground (and is quite long). I will try to summarise the argument as much as possible, but, to make it easier to read, I will also attempt to flag the specific topics addressed at each point, so that you may focus on those matters of greater interest to you. The paper is structured as follows: Section II summarises the relevant economic literature. While consumers gain from increases in static efficiency in the short run, economics teaches us…

Marco Botta and Klaus Wiedemann ‘EU Competition Law Enforcement vis-à-vis Exploitative Conducts in the Data Economy’ Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper No. 18-08

This long paper (90 pages), which can be found here, seeks to understand how traditional principles of EU law – particularly those related to exploitative abuses and respective remedies – apply to new business models that mainly rely on processing large amounts of users’ data. The analysis does not extend to the US because, following Trinko, the authors consider that antitrust law there does not extend to exploitative practices, even if the FTC has powers under the Sherman Act to pursue such practices under consumer and unfair practices law. I am afraid the review is rather long, because this paper’s contents are the equivalent of multiple articles. The paper is structured as follows: Section 2 provides an overview of European case law vis-à-vis exploitative abuses. Art. 102 TFEU lists a number of exploitative abuses. Nevertheless, the European Commission has long focused on investigating exclusionary, rather than exploitative abuses. While this has led to limited case law on exploitative abuses, the authors identify…

Ariel Ezrachi on ‘EU Competition Law Goals and The Digital Economy’ (2018) Report for BEUC – The European Consumer Organisation

This paper  can be found here. I have already reviewed it in an earlier post. At the time, I focused on the article’s overview of the goals of EU competition law. However, the article also contained a detailed discussion of the impact that the digital economy may have on these goals. I was unable to review this discussion then, so I propose to do it here. Competition policy is one of several instruments used to advance the goals of the European Treaties. According to the European Commission, competition on the market is protected as a means of enhancing consumer welfare and of ensuring an efficient allocation of resources. This notwithstanding, EU competition law has also consistently been held to protect ‘not only the interests of competitors or of consumers, but also the structure of the market and, in so doing, competition as such.’ Moreover, a genuinely indigenous objective is worthy of note, namely that of promoting European market integration. In addition…

Philippe Aghion, Stefan Bechtold, Lea Cassar and Holger Herz ‘The Causal Effects of Competition on Innovation: Experimental Evidence’ (2018) The Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization 34(2) 162

This paper, which can be found here, adds to the literature on the relationship between competition and innovation, which has been the subject of longstanding attention by economists. However, existing empirical studies on competition and innovation suffer from a number of limitations. The authors seek to address these limitations as regards a specific type of innovation models – so called ‘Step-by-Step Innovation Models’. Their study shows that, as long as key assumptions of the step-by-step innovation model are met, theoretical predictions of this model are confirmed by laboratory empirical data. Section 2 looks at ‘Step-by-Step Innovation Models’. The main characteristic of step-by-step innovation models when compared with previous Schumpeterian models (where competition is for the market) is that innovation incentives do not depend on post-innovation rents only, but rather on the difference between post-innovation and pre-innovation rents of incumbent firms. In the basic model setup, an industry consists of two firms which produce the same good and compete over selling the…