Francisco Marcos, Barry J. Rodger and Miguel Sousa Ferro ‘The Promotion and Harmonization of Antitrust Damages Claims by Directive EU/2014/104 in ‘The EU Antitrust Damages Directive: Transposition in the Member States (OUP, 2018)

This paper is the second chapter of a book on ‘The EU Antitrust Damages Directive: Transposition in the Member States’, of which the authors are the editors. Oxford University Press will publish the book later this year – in December, I believe. This draft chapter can be found here. The paper assesses critically the features of the EU Damages Directive and the challenges Member States face in its implementation. The authors examine the contents and goals of the Directive, its provisions, and whether the Directive is likely to achieve its purported aim of fostering compensation of victims of antitrust infringements. It is structured as follows: A first section describes the path to the adoption of the Directive. The paper describes the various stages in the progressive promotion of private competition enforcement in Europe. After the CJEU judgment in Courage in 1999, which instituted a right to compensation for competition infringements, the Commission prepared a Green Paper on damages actions for…

Miriam C. Buiten, Peter van Wijck and Jan Kees Winters ‘Does the European Damages Directive Make Consumers Better Off’ (2018) Journal of Competition Law & Economics, 14(1) 91

The paper seeks to uncover what are the implications of private enforcement for deterrence, leniency, and consumer welfare. To address this question, the authors develop a dynamic model that considers two opposing effects on deterrence that arise from allowing partial compensation of victims. First, competition damages may reduce incentives to apply for leniency. Second, liability for damages may lead firms to refrain from engaging in a cartel in the first place by increasing potential participation costs. The authors find that these effects act in opposite directions, so there is a balance to be struck between promoting compensation and leniency applications. The paper is organized as follows. Section II discusses the legal position of competition victims under the EU Damages Directive, and remaining obstacles to obtaining compensation. The Directive aims to remove the main obstacles that victims of competition law infringements face when trying to obtain compensation for their loss. The Directive specifies that “any natural or legal person who has…

Jurgita Malinauskaite and Caroline Cauffman ‘The Transposition of the Antitrust Damages Directive in the Small Member States of the EU – A Comparative Perspective’ (2018) Journal of European Competition Law & Practice 9(8) 496

This paper, which can be found here, focuses on how four small EU Member States (Belgium, Latvia, Lithuania, and Luxembourg) transposed the various provisions of the Damages Directive, and on the challenges these countries faced in their attempt to align the Directive’s provisions with their national legal orders. It looks at the transposition of the Directive as regards the following topics: (i) the right to compensation; (ii) disclosure of evidence; (iii) effect of infringement decisions; (iv) limitation periods; (v) joint and several liability; (vi) passing on defences; (vii) presumption and quantification of harm; and (viii) consensual dispute resolution. The paper is quite detailed and descriptive, so it would be otiose to review how transposition occurred in the sampled countries as regards each of these topics. Suffice to say that the paper provides a good overview of some technical and linguistic obstacles these countries faced when transposing the Directive, as well as of the main challenges in aligning the Directive’s provisions with national…