The CAT’s Paroxetine decision (Paroxetine GSK v CMA [2018] CAT 4)

This post contains a fairly long discussion, so those who are familiar with the case may want to skip it. This decision – which can be found here – concerns  a pay for delay case and identifies a number of interesting questions regarding this type of conduct – some of which were referred to the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). I do not propose to summarise the decision (it is 180 pages long). Instead, I will merely review the parts that I found most interesting. In particular, the judgment contains a very clear discussion of how the law stands as regards pay-for delay agreements in Europe. It also reviews EU law, particularly in the context of the Tribunal’s decision to make a preliminary reference to the CJEU. These questions flow mostly from the debate, apparent in my earlier posts, regarding whether pay-for-delay agreements should be treated as restrictions by object or by effect under EU law following…

Chris Fonteijn, Ilan Akker and Wolf Sauter  ‘Reconciling competition and IP law: the case of patented pharmaceuticals and dominance abuse’,  in Gabriella Muscolo and Mariaanna Tavassi (eds.) The Interplay between Competition Law and Intellectual Property – An international perspective (Kluwer Law International, Forthcoming)

The paper – a draft of which can be found here – discusses how competition law may be applied with regard to abuses of dominance involving patented pharmaceuticals. It argues that the pay for delay cases in both the US and the EU are only the first step in exploring the application of competition law to such products. The paper then examines abuses of the patent system with the aim to exclude competitors and, second, whether excessive prices can be sanctioned as regards IP-protected pharmaceutical products. The paper is structured as follows: Section II investigates the interaction between IP and competition law. This has been covered extensively in previous emails, so I will merely summarise the basic points. Inasmuch as IP law creates temporary monopolies, this would seem to create a tension with competition law, but this tension is merely apparent. Both competition and IP law ultimately seek to promote consumer welfare, and the protection granted by IP law does not amount…

Elisabetta Maria Lanza and Paola Roberta Sfasciotti ‘Excessive Price Abuses: The Italian Aspen Case’ (2018) Journal of European Competition Law & Practice 9(6) 382

This paper – which can be found here – is of particular interest because the authors were the case handlers in this case, which is one of the (very) few recent cases on excessive pricing. The paper begins with a discussion of why enforcement against excessive pricing is frowned upon by competition agencies (and absolutely discarded in the US). First, there may be a negative impact on investment caused by limits to a company’s freedom to set prices, which may limit its ability to recover capital invested in research. Second, in normal conditions regulatory intervention is unnecessary: the market will self-correct, because excessive prices will stimulate the entry of competitors into the market. Third, as a rule competition authorities seek to avoid having to decide what is the ‘correct’ or ‘fair’ price, since this would require a judgement which is closer to the competences of a sectoral regulator. Fourth, the analysis of situations of excessive pricing faces significant difficulties in…